sábado, 13 de junho de 2015


Tel Aviv - The Church of St. Peter (Russian Orthodox)
 The sunny, spacious gardens surrounding the Russian Orthodox Church of Tabitha’s Tomb is a unique place to commemorate Peter’s raising of Tabitha from the dead (Acts 9:36-43), and to pray in a rarified old-world atmosphere. 
The Banias Waterfall

The Banias Waterfall provides one of Israel’s most beautifully tranquil spots. Set within the Banias Nature Reserve in the Golan, the Banias is a spring which rises from the base of Mount Hermon, Israel’s tallest mountain, flowing for about 3.5km through a gorge, eventually coming to the impressive waterfall, the largest in Israel.

Jerusalem - City Wall in the moonlight and Jewish Quarter

Is one of the four traditional quarters of the Old City of Jerusalem. The 116,000 square meter area lies in the southeastern sector of the walled city, and stretches from the Zion Gatein the south, along the Armenian Quarter on the west, up to the Street of the Chain in the north and extends to the Western Wall and the Temple Mount in the east. In the early 20th century, the Jewish population of the quarter reached 19,000.

Ceasarea - Ancient aqueduct and Haifa - The Bahai Shrines
 The town was built by Herod the Great about 25–13 BCE as the port city Caesarea Maritima. It served as an administrative center of Judaea Province of the Roman Empire, and later the capital of the Byzantine Palaestina Prima province during the classic period. Following the Muslim conquest in the 7th century, the city had an Arab majority until Crusader renovation, but was again abandoned after the Mamluk conquest. It was populated in 1884 by Bosniak immigrants, who settled in a small fishing village. In 1940, kibbutz Sdot Yam was established next to the village. In February 1948 the village was conquered by a Palmach unit commanded by Yitzhak Rabin, its people already having fled following an attack by the Stern Gang. In 1952, a Jewish town of Caesarea was established near the ruins of the old city, which were made into the national park of Caesarea Maritima.

On July 8, 2008, the Shrine of the Báb, along with several other Bahá'í holy sites in Haifa and the nearby city of Acre (Akko), were inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.[3][4] The Bahá'í shrines "are the first sites connected with a relatively new religious tradition to be recognized by the World Heritage List."[5] The UNESCO World Heritage Committee considers the sites to be "of outstanding universal value [and]...inscribed for the testimony they provide to the Bahá’i’s strong tradition of pilgrimage and for their profound meaning for the faith.

Old Jaffa - The clock Tower and Tel Aviv skyline at night
Is one of seven clock towers built in Israel during the Ottoman period. The others are located in SafedAcreNazarethHaifaNablus (West Bank) and Jerusalem, the last being the only one that has not survived until today.[1]
The Jaffa Clock Tower stands in the middle of Yefet street at the northern entrance of Jaffa, the ancient city that is now a part of the greater Tel Aviv. The tower, which is made of limestone, incorporates two clocks and a plaque commemorating the Israelis killed in the battle for the town in the 1948 Arab–Israeli War.
is the second most populous city in Israel, with a population of 414,600 and a land area of 20 square miles (52 km2).[1] Tel Aviv forms part of the Tel Aviv Metropolitan Area, also known as Gush Dan, which constitutes Israel's largest metropolitan area and has 3,464,100 residents, 42% of the country's population. Tel Aviv-Yafo is the largest and most populous section of the metropolitan area.
Postcards sent me last Friday for Tel Aviv tourist Information center.
Visit: http://tel-aviv.gov.il/eng/Pages/HomePage.aspx
Thanks a lot! 

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